Painting Kerr&King Adobe Buildings

by. Josh Kael

We produce good range of Adobe style buildings which are very popular, they're usable for many theatres of conflict and are simplicity itself to paint. Despite this I seen some really bad ones. Example. we gave a load of buildings to our local games shop for their Flames of War North African table which they duly painted up, and... Well let's just here's how we paint the, it's really quick, easy and they look pretty good when it's all done ;)

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Materials

Paints. I use more or less all Vallejo Model colour these days and for this project my main colours are going to be Dark Yellow, Desert Sand, Ivory and White. I'll also be using a few other colours for the bricks, wood and curtain. My main brush is going to be a size 10 Pro Art System 3 Filbert, it's a fairly low cost workmanlike brush that really gets the job done and providing you give a good clean in warm soapy water when you've done with it it'll last you ages.

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Preparation

It's recommended to firstly wash resin in warm soapy water before you try to paint it to remove any residue from the casting process. Then if you are not planning on using any of the modular additional items we produce I'd suggest gluing the roof onto your building, a few blobs of Superglue should do the trick.

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Filling

If you decided to glue the roof on you can if you wish opt to fill in the gap with a bit of modelling putty, I always use Milliput for this type of chore. When filling in on Adobes don't be too careful with the finish texture of your putty, as you can see I simply drag a tool across the putty so you get those little 'tears' in the surface.

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Painting

At last the fun bit. Nice and easy to start, first off a couple of coats of Matt Black spray for an undercoat.

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Next a base coat of Dark Yellow, don't be too precious about this, just thin it down add a bit of flow enhancer if you wish and slap it on. There is no point in painting around detail such as brickwork and woodwork you are going to be drybrushing in a minute.
Now first drybrush, I use a 50/50 mix of Vallejo Desert Yellow and Ivory and drybrush the whole thing.

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Drybrushing, at the risk of sounding patronising I'm going to give some guidelines on this most basic of techniques, when I have time I'll do a whole article on it. But for now the secret is in the name 'dry' the brush needs to be dry before you start, really dry not just a quick wipe on a paper towel, the paint needs to be thick and undiluted. Once you have got your brush nice and dry and dipped it into your undiluted creamy thick paint you need wipe almost all of it off, again it's 'drybrushing'. A good check to see if your brush is dry enough is to test it on the back of your hand, if the paint only colours the high points of your flesh and leaves the deeper grain of your skin unpainted then everything is perfect. Now just move your brush across the surface of you building so that the bristles only touch the raised up texture of the walls.

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Second drybrush, as before using straight Ivory paint
Third and final drybrush, this time a very light 'dusting' with a very very dry brush and barely touching the surface of the building.

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Filling in the blanks

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Now we simply need to do the little bits of detailing, first off using a much finer brush say a size 1 round, whatever make you prefer paint all the areas of detail, doors, bricks windows etc. black.
We leave the windows like that as they wouldn't be glazed and it would be pretty dark in side. Using a medium brown in my case Vallejo German Camouflage Medium Brown although GW Bestial Brown is also good (though very expensive) and a smaller drybrushing brush, size 4 is ideal carefully give the bricks a coat of paint. Keep it neat, only brush away from the stuff you've painted and take your time. Remember it's called drybrushing not speedbrushing, I don't understand why some folk have to scrub away like a maniac, we're trying to put paint on not start a fire. Do the same for any wood work using a darker brown Vallejo German Camouflage Black Brown or GW scorched brown

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Now drybrush the bricks with dark yellow and the wood with whatever colour you used last stage and some Desert Yellow and a bit of Ivory added.
Finally a last very light drybush of both the bricks and woodwork using Ivory and a very 'dry' brush. I then painted the curtain blue and drybrushed a little Desert Yellow over it to give it a dusty appearance

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And there we go, this is simply the same picture as above but with the cutting mat removed and swanky blue gradient inserted.

And Basically that's it, now you can get cracking on your newly purchased Desert City in a Box models and in no time at all you'll have your very own miniature masterpiece.

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